tree: 2bcc3b65be2c2c5b44295bc99af2162bab249919 [path history] [tgz]
  1. 01-blinky/
  2. 02-string-functions/
  3. 03-rpc/
  4. 04-kvs/
  5. 05-factory-test/
  6. README.md
workshop/README.md

Give Pigweed a Whirl Workshop

00:
Setup

Intro + setup.

01:
Blinky

Getting to blinky.

02:
Testing

Writing tests.

03:
RPC

Calling RPCs.

04:
KVS

Key Value Store.

05:
FactoryTest

Testing in the factory.

logo

Intro

Welcome! In this workshop we will introduce some of the more compelling Pigweed features that make embedded product development easier.

You can find each section linked above numbering 00 to 05.

1. Host Machine Setup


Python and Git are the only prerequisites for getting started with Pigweed. Download and install if you don't already have them available.

Windows

  1. Use the Windows installers for Python and Git from:

    Make sure to add them to your system path during installation.

  2. Enable long file paths enabled on Windows. This can be done using regedit or by running this as an administrator:

    REG ADD HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\FileSystem /v LongPathsEnabled /t REG_DWORD /d 1
    

Linux

If you are using a Teensy 3.x or 4.x board for the first time on a Linux machine you will need to install the udev rules from: https://www.pjrc.com/teensy/49-teensy.rules

Mac

Python and Git should be installed by default on Mac OS.

2. Repo Setup


Open a Terminal (cmd.exe on Windows) and clone this repo with:

git clone --recursive https://pigweed.googlesource.com/pigweed/sample_project

No worries if you missed --recursive! Run this to pull third_party/nanopb and third_party/pigweed.

git submodule update --init

If you want to pull new changes run:

git pull --recurse-submodules

3. Run bootstrap


After cloning the build tools can be installed with the bootstrap scripts. This is only required after the initial clone or updating Pigweed.

Windows

bootstrap.bat

Linux & Mac

. ./bootstrap.sh

After the initial bootstrap, use the activate scripts to setup your shell for development.

Windows

activate.bat

Linux & Mac

. ./activate.sh

4. Install Teensyduino Core


To build for Arduino boards you must install a core. At this time only the Teensyduino core is supported. Check the Pigweed Arduino target docs for more info.

All Arduino cores should be installed into third_party/pigweed/third_party/arduino/cores/

Run this to install the Teensy core:

arduino_builder install-core --prefix third_party/pigweed/third_party/arduino/cores/ --core-name teensy

5. Build!


STM32F429i Discovery Board

To build for the stm32f429i_disc1 board run:

gn gen out

Then start the compile with:

ninja -C out

Teensy 3.x/4.x

To build for a Teensy 4.0 board run the following.

Windows

Run gn args out which will open a text editor. Paste in the following, save and close the editor.

pw_arduino_build_CORE_PATH="//third_party/pigweed/third_party/arduino/cores"
pw_arduino_build_CORE_NAME="teensy"
pw_arduino_build_PACKAGE_NAME = "teensy/avr"
pw_arduino_build_BOARD="teensy40"
pw_arduino_build_MENU_OPTIONS=["menu.usb.serial", "menu.keys.en-us"]
pw_arduino_use_test_server=false

The arduino_board arg can be set to any of these:

  • "teensy31" - Teensy 3.2 / 3.1
  • "teensy35" - Teensy 3.5
  • "teensy36" - Teensy 3.6
  • "teensy40" - Teensy 4.0
  • "teensy41" - Teensy 4.1

Args need only be set once per out directory. After setting them gn gen out alone can be used. Once gn is done, compile everything with:

ninja -C out

Linux & Mac

You can use gn args out as shown above or include the args on the command line:

gn gen out --args='
  pw_arduino_build_CORE_PATH="//third_party/pigweed/third_party/arduino/cores"
  pw_arduino_build_CORE_NAME="teensy"
  pw_arduino_build_PACKAGE_NAME = "teensy/avr"
  pw_arduino_build_BOARD="teensy40"
  pw_arduino_build_MENU_OPTIONS=["menu.usb.serial", "menu.keys.en-us"]
  pw_arduino_use_test_server=false
'

After gn is done, compile everything with:

ninja -C out

GN and Ninja Reference


Basics

  • Create a build directory named out.

    gn gen out
    
  • Set build options with gn args.

    gn args out
    
  • Compile with

    ninja -C out
    
  • Clean by deleting the out folder or running:

    ninja -C out -t clean
    

Inspecting

  • List buildable targets.

    gn ls out
    
  • Inspect a target to see it's dependencies. E.g. cflags, ldflags, etc.

    Target names start with a // to denote the root level of the project. The format in this example is //{FOLDER1}/{$FOLDER2}:{BUILD.gn_TARGET_NAME}({TOOLCHAIN})

    Teensy

    gn desc out "//workshop/01-blinky:blinky(//targets/arduino:arduino_debug)" --tree
    

    stm32f429i_disc1

    gn desc out "//workshop/01-blinky:blinky(//targets/stm32f429i_disc1:stm32f429i_disc1_debug)" --tree
    

    Host

    gn desc out "//workshop/01-blinky:blinky(//targets/host:host_debug)" --tree
    

ccache

Pigweed can make use of ccache if you have it available on your system PATH. This will speed up recompiling previously compiled artifacts dramatically. Useful if you regularly clean your out directory. Set this build arg to enable:

pw_command_launcher="ccache"

Editor Integration

Use --export-compile-commands to create the out/compile_commands.json file for use with lsp servers like clangd.

gn gen out --export-compile-commands

clangd can be integrating with various text editor extensions such as:

Further Reading